the fandom life

superwhohannilockpotter:

I will never not reblog this gif set whenever it comes across my dash.

(Source: seawolph, via cas-is-an-angel-you-assbutt)



cumaeansibyl:

kisssinpink:

lloveuntilwebleed:

rareandradiantmaiden:

gaymermaids:

knifeplay:

girl-bear:

campaignofdistractions:

The monetary cost for a rape victim to receive treatment at a hospital in the United States.

EVERYONE

EVERYONE

EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THIS

what the actual FUCK

I wish I could even be shocked

Just gonna keep reblogging this

fuck

this is the biggest crock of fucking bullshit i’ve ever fucking seen FUCK

"but why didn’t you go to the hospital?"


cumaeansibyl:

kisssinpink:

lloveuntilwebleed:

rareandradiantmaiden:

gaymermaids:

knifeplay:

girl-bear:

campaignofdistractions:

“The monetary cost for a rape victim to receive treatment at a hospital in the United States.”

EVERYONE
EVERYONE
EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THIS

what the actual FUCK

I wish I could even be shocked

Just gonna keep reblogging this

fuck

this is the biggest crock of fucking bullshit i’ve ever fucking seen FUCK

"but why didn’t you go to the hospital?"

cupidmike:

mjwatson:

A Response to ‘Women Against Feminism.’

Imagine this:

The year is 2014. You are a white Western woman. You wake up in the morning in a comfortably sized house or flat. You have a full or part-time job that enables you to pay your rent or mortgage. You have been to school and maybe even college or university as well. You can read and write and count. You own a car or have a driver’s licence. You have enough money in your own bank account to feed and clothe yourself. You have access to the Internet. You can vote. You have a boyfriend or girlfriend of your choosing, who you can also marry if you want to, and raise a family with. You walk down the street wearing whatever you feel like wearing. You can go to bars and clubs and sleep with whomever you want.

Your world is full of freedom and possibility.

Then you pick up a newspaper or go online. You read about angry women ranting about sexism and inequality. You see phrases like ‘rape-culture’ and ‘slut-shaming.’ You furrow your brow and think to yourself: ‘What are they so angry about? There is no such thing as sexism anymore.’

Now imagine this:

The year is 2013. You are a 25 year-old Pakistani woman. A few months ago, you married the man you love. A man you choose for yourself. You are also pregnant with his child. You see your life stretching out before you, filled with hope and happiness. Suddenly, you and your husband are dragged away from each other. You are both beaten with bricks and batons. You can’t fight back. You can’t escape. No one comes to help you. Through your fading vision, you look up, and look into the eyes of one of your assailants: into the eyes of your father.

The year is 2013. You are a 23 year-old Indian woman. You are a physiotherapy student with a promising career ahead of you. You are sitting on a private bus travelling home alone on a warm December evening. You gaze out of the window as the buildings of New Dheli rush past you and feel content. Suddenly, a blunt force hits the back of your head and you fall to the floor of the bus. A group of strange men are standing over you. They bring the metal bar down on you again and again and again until all you can taste is the blood filling up your mouth. You pray that you will die soon. And you do, but not then. You are raped, beaten, and tortured over and over again. Death is slow and agonising.

The year is 2014. You are a 13 year-old girl from Niger. You no longer live there though. You are now living in the neighbouring country Nigeria, sitting alone in small room on a small bed in a small apartment high above the city of Kano. You are not allowed to leave. Your stomach is swollen from the unwanted life growing inside of it. You had no choice. The father is a man in his 40s. He is a businessman. He has bought you as his wife. You were a penniless, uneducated girl when he came for you. You don’t know of any life you could have had. Neither did your family: just one less mouth for them to feed. You still have the body of a child, and it’s straining under the pressure from the one inside of you. You feel like you’re about to be split in two. You don’t wonder if you will survive the birth. A part of you doesn’t want to.

These are fictionalised accounts of real events that have happened to real women living in our world today. They follow the past 250 years of women and men campaigning for women to be given equal rights to men to prevent these kinds of injustices and abuses on the grounds of gender taking place. Over the course of this time, campaigners – Feminists, both female and male – have been locked up, beaten, tortured, and even killed, in the pursuit of equality. They did this with pen and ink and print; they did this with their voices; they did this with their bodies; they did this with art and music; they did in courts of law and halls and houses of government that they fought be to allowed into.

They did this so that women would no longer been seen as property, livestock, breeding machines, sex objects, punching bags, or infantile morons. They did this not just for themselves, but also for their daughters, and their daughters, and their daughters for generations to come. They did this for women they would never meet – women who lived across countries, across vast oceans, across the entire globe, and even across time.

They did this so that women like me – a white Western woman – could attend school and university; to learn to read, write, and think critically; to gain a degree; to get a job and be paid an equal salary to a man in the same position; and to sit here with my own computer and type all of this.

Feminism is a movement for freedom, equality, choice, love, compassion, respect, solidarity, and education. We may argue, we may disagree, we may struggle to understand the choices and perspectives of others sometimes, but these core beliefs of the movement have never changed, and they never will.

That is why I am a Feminist.

If you feel that you have so far lived your life unaffected by even the mildest form of sexism – anything from feeling uncomfortable when a man catcalls you in the street, to feeling scared walking home alone at night in a secluded area – and are treated with love and respect by every man in your life, then to you I say: I’m glad for you. If you don’t think you need feminism, then that is a victory for the movement. You have fulfilled all those dreams that every suffragette being force-fed in prison and every ‘witch’ burnt at the stake dreamed you would one day.

But perhaps take a second to consider the life of the Pakistani woman who was beaten to death by her own family for marrying a man of her choosing. Or the life of the Indian woman who was raped, beaten, and murdered on a bus by a gang of men. Or the life of the little girl in Niger who was sold to a man more than twice her own age and forced to carry a baby that may kill her to deliver. Do they still need feminism?

And perhaps take a second to consider this too: Even in our liberal, Western world, why do women still only fill 24% of senior management jobs? Why are more women than men domestically abused or even killed every week at the hands of their male partner or ex-partner? Why is there still a pay gap (in the UK specifically) of 15% for women doing the same jobs and working the same hours as men?

And what about on a cultural level? Have you ever noticed how comedy panel shows usually only have one female panellist compared to 4-5 male ones? That almost every dieting product on the market is solely aimed at women? How a lot of newspapers and advertising campaigns will use a sexualised or pornographic image of a woman to sell news or products that have nothing to do with sex?

Or perhaps on a personal level: Do you choose to wear certain clothes because you want to or because you feel ‘unfeminine’ if you don’t? Do you choose to cover yourself up because you want to or because you feel ashamed or intimidated by a man looking at your body? Do you shave your legs and underarm hair because you want to or because you will look ‘ugly’ if you don’t? Did you parents dress you in pink as a baby because they liked the colour or because you were born a girl? Do you want to have children because you want to or because you are a woman?

When you look at yourself in the mirror in the morning, do you see yourself through your own eyes, or through the eyes of the men that will look at you when you walk out the door?

The fact is, like it or not, you still live a world where gender matters. Where gender controls not just the entire course of your life – but the lives of women all over the world. Every second, a child will be born female in a country where she will persecuted for this random biological occurrence for the rest of her life. So before you hold up your anti-Feminist placard proudly and smile at your own sense of empowerment, think not what Feminism can do for you, but what it can do for that one girl. She needs someone to stand up for her. That someone could be you.

[ x ]

Read this. Read all of this. Then read it again.

(via whovians-and-sherlockians)


cupidmike:

mjwatson:

A Response to ‘Women Against Feminism.’
Imagine this:
The year is 2014. You are a white Western woman. You wake up in the morning in a comfortably sized house or flat. You have a full or part-time job that enables you to pay your rent or mortgage. You have been to school and maybe even college or university as well. You can read and write and count. You own a car or have a driver’s licence. You have enough money in your own bank account to feed and clothe yourself. You have access to the Internet. You can vote. You have a boyfriend or girlfriend of your choosing, who you can also marry if you want to, and raise a family with. You walk down the street wearing whatever you feel like wearing. You can go to bars and clubs and sleep with whomever you want.
Your world is full of freedom and possibility.
Then you pick up a newspaper or go online. You read about angry women ranting about sexism and inequality. You see phrases like ‘rape-culture’ and ‘slut-shaming.’ You furrow your brow and think to yourself: ‘What are they so angry about? There is no such thing as sexism anymore.’
Now imagine this: 
The year is 2013. You are a 25 year-old Pakistani woman. A few months ago, you married the man you love. A man you choose for yourself. You are also pregnant with his child. You see your life stretching out before you, filled with hope and happiness. Suddenly, you and your husband are dragged away from each other. You are both beaten with bricks and batons. You can’t fight back. You can’t escape. No one comes to help you. Through your fading vision, you look up, and look into the eyes of one of your assailants: into the eyes of your father.
The year is 2013. You are a 23 year-old Indian woman. You are a physiotherapy student with a promising career ahead of you. You are sitting on a private bus travelling home alone on a warm December evening. You gaze out of the window as the buildings of New Dheli rush past you and feel content. Suddenly, a blunt force hits the back of your head and you fall to the floor of the bus. A group of strange men are standing over you. They bring the metal bar down on you again and again and again until all you can taste is the blood filling up your mouth. You pray that you will die soon. And you do, but not then. You are raped, beaten, and tortured over and over again. Death is slow and agonising.
The year is 2014. You are a 13 year-old girl from Niger. You no longer live there though. You are now living in the neighbouring country Nigeria, sitting alone in small room on a small bed in a small apartment high above the city of Kano. You are not allowed to leave. Your stomach is swollen from the unwanted life growing inside of it. You had no choice. The father is a man in his 40s. He is a businessman. He has bought you as his wife. You were a penniless, uneducated girl when he came for you. You don’t know of any life you could have had. Neither did your family: just one less mouth for them to feed. You still have the body of a child, and it’s straining under the pressure from the one inside of you. You feel like you’re about to be split in two. You don’t wonder if you will survive the birth. A part of you doesn’t want to.
These are fictionalised accounts of real events that have happened to real women living in our world today. They follow the past 250 years of women and men campaigning for women to be given equal rights to men to prevent these kinds of injustices and abuses on the grounds of gender taking place. Over the course of this time, campaigners – Feminists, both female and male – have been locked up, beaten, tortured, and even killed, in the pursuit of equality. They did this with pen and ink and print; they did this with their voices; they did this with their bodies; they did this with art and music; they did in courts of law and halls and houses of government that they fought be to allowed into.
They did this so that women would no longer been seen as property, livestock, breeding machines, sex objects, punching bags, or infantile morons. They did this not just for themselves, but also for their daughters, and their daughters, and their daughters for generations to come. They did this for women they would never meet – women who lived across countries, across vast oceans, across the entire globe, and even across time.
They did this so that women like me – a white Western woman – could attend school and university; to learn to read, write, and think critically; to gain a degree; to get a job and be paid an equal salary to a man in the same position; and to sit here with my own computer and type all of this.
Feminism is a movement for freedom, equality, choice, love, compassion, respect, solidarity, and education. We may argue, we may disagree, we may struggle to understand the choices and perspectives of others sometimes, but these core beliefs of the movement have never changed, and they never will.
That is why I am a Feminist.
If you feel that you have so far lived your life unaffected by even the mildest form of sexism – anything from feeling uncomfortable when a man catcalls you in the street, to feeling scared walking home alone at night in a secluded area – and are treated with love and respect by every man in your life, then to you I say: I’m glad for you. If you don’t think you need feminism, then that is a victory for the movement. You have fulfilled all those dreams that every suffragette being force-fed in prison and every ‘witch’ burnt at the stake dreamed you would one day.
But perhaps take a second to consider the life of the Pakistani woman who was beaten to death by her own family for marrying a man of her choosing. Or the life of the Indian woman who was raped, beaten, and murdered on a bus by a gang of men. Or the life of the little girl in Niger who was sold to a man more than twice her own age and forced to carry a baby that may kill her to deliver. Do they still need feminism?
And perhaps take a second to consider this too: Even in our liberal, Western world, why do women still only fill 24% of senior management jobs? Why are more women than men domestically abused or even killed every week at the hands of their male partner or ex-partner? Why is there still a pay gap (in the UK specifically) of 15% for women doing the same jobs and working the same hours as men?
And what about on a cultural level? Have you ever noticed how comedy panel shows usually only have one female panellist compared to 4-5 male ones? That almost every dieting product on the market is solely aimed at women? How a lot of newspapers and advertising campaigns will use a sexualised or pornographic image of a woman to sell news or products that have nothing to do with sex?
Or perhaps on a personal level: Do you choose to wear certain clothes because you want to or because you feel ‘unfeminine’ if you don’t? Do you choose to cover yourself up because you want to or because you feel ashamed or intimidated by a man looking at your body? Do you shave your legs and underarm hair because you want to or because you will look ‘ugly’ if you don’t? Did you parents dress you in pink as a baby because they liked the colour or because you were born a girl? Do you want to have children because you want to or because you are a woman?
When you look at yourself in the mirror in the morning, do you see yourself through your own eyes, or through the eyes of the men that will look at you when you walk out the door?
The fact is, like it or not, you still live a world where gender matters. Where gender controls not just the entire course of your life – but the lives of women all over the world. Every second, a child will be born female in a country where she will persecuted for this random biological occurrence for the rest of her life. So before you hold up your anti-Feminist placard proudly and smile at your own sense of empowerment, think not what Feminism can do for you, but what it can do for that one girl. She needs someone to stand up for her. That someone could be you.
[ x ]

Read this. Read all of this. Then read it again.

mockingday:

Watch Emma’s speech and take action

(via everythingharrypotter)



fishingboatproceeds:

water:

Via fishingboatproceeds:

During my time in Ethiopia, I met many people who rely on health care outposts like the one seen in the bottom two pictures here. Through these outposts, children and families get vaccines, diagnoses, and treatment for diseases like diarrhea and pneumonia.

But most of these families, and most of their health care facilities, don’t have regular access to clean water. When I asked people about their greatest needs, almost all of them—from the Women’s Health Army volunteers to children—cited clean water first.

More than 45 million Ethiopians live without clean water. I spoke to women who walk miles every other day with heavy jerrycans to get drinking water for their families. The people I met explained how lack of clean water is a health problem, a financial problem, and a family problem.

So for the next week nerdfighteria is teaming up with water.org to raise money to build sustainable wells so that more than 4,000 people in Ethiopia can have clean water. Please join me in donating—or, if you can’t, in spreading the word. Thanks, and DFTBA.

Water.org thanks John Green for his continued support.

That’s a pretty sweet tumblr username, water.org. I can’t believe you guys got “water” and I’m stuck with “fishingboatproceeds.” 

MORE IMPORTANTLY, IF WE GET TO $100,000 BILL GATES WILL MATCH OUR DONATION AND $8,000 PEOPLE IN RURAL ETHIOPIA WILL GET ACCESS TO SAFE WATER THROUGH NEW WELLS. We’ve already raised over $16,000. Thanks, and keep spreading the word!



UN Report on Childhood Mortality

fishingboatproceeds:

The UN’s report on childhood mortality was published today, which is the kind of event I really nerd out about. 

Highlights:

- 200,000 fewer children died in 2013 than in 2012.

- The worldwide mortality rate among children under 5 has fallen by nearly half since 1990.

- Many countries (including Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Liberia) have cut under 5 mortality by more than TWO THIRDS since 1990.

Lowlights:

- 19,000 children under five died every day of 2013. Most of them continue to die from preventable or treatable diseases.

- More than a third of child deaths result from three preventable and treatable diseases: pneumonia, diarrhea, and malaria.

- We will likely miss the global development goal of cutting child mortality by two thirds by 2015 and need to continue to speed the rate of decline.

- Between 1990 and 2013, 223,000,000 children died. Most of those deaths were preventable. 

More here in the New York Times report on the study.


Anonymous said: Re: your "rule about naked people" -- How about people who take nude photos of themselves not be stupid and use storage devices that can be hacked, like cloud storage (or take any risks close to that)? Just HOW much personal responsibility does your generation need to shed before you get it through your thick skulls that it only costs $20 for a decent external hard drive these days? :|

fishingboatproceeds:

"The lock on your diary wasn’t very good, so it’s your fault I read your diary."

"Your car has a window that can be shattered, so it’s your fault I broke into it."



http://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/police-growing-increasingly-concerned-over-missing-alice-gross-as-stars-back-appeal-to-find-her-9701963.html

110-sweettalk:

hi guys ,important news, that you may of heard a girl called alice gross is missing, could you please spread the word ,she was a v true friend of mine and ive known her for a couple of years from dance, please keep an eye out

thank you :’(


trusting-the-disgusting:

andsolskjaerhaswonitt:

fifteen-fath0ms:

iwillsavemyworld:

elisabeth9uk:

bxrakat:

bxrakat:

hi so my friend alice has been missing for over 24 hours now and everyone is getting really worried, so if you live around london uk would you please ring 101 if you see this girl, it would mean a lot thank you bye

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-28997068 this bbc news story explains more about it so please help if you can #findalice

Please help find Alice - west London - URGENT help needed

PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST THIS

she was last seen in Kew by the canal, but she could have walked anywhere from there

shes only 14 and has health problems that make her seriously vulnerable

another pic of her:

REBLOG YOU NEVER KNOW IF ANY OF YOUR FOLLOWERS MAY LIVE IN WEST LONDON AND KNOW SOMETHING THAT COULD HELP

Go go go this is so important

Guys Alice goes to my school, please please please reblog this especially if you live in London cause the more people that know about this the better.

UK relevant

(Source: skelatonclique, via sherlocksmoustache)


trusting-the-disgusting:

andsolskjaerhaswonitt:

fifteen-fath0ms:

iwillsavemyworld:

elisabeth9uk:

bxrakat:

bxrakat:

hi so my friend alice has been missing for over 24 hours now and everyone is getting really worried, so if you live around london uk would you please ring 101 if you see this girl, it would mean a lot thank you bye

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-28997068 this bbc news story explains more about it so please help if you can #findalice

Please help find Alice - west London - URGENT help needed

PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST THIS
she was last seen in Kew by the canal, but she could have walked anywhere from there
shes only 14 and has health problems that make her seriously vulnerable
another pic of her:

REBLOG YOU NEVER KNOW IF ANY OF YOUR FOLLOWERS MAY LIVE IN WEST LONDON AND KNOW SOMETHING THAT COULD HELP

Go go go this is so important

Guys Alice goes to my school, please please please reblog this especially if you live in London cause the more people that know about this the better.

UK relevant

My name is not Annie. It’s Quvenzhané.
Quvenzhané Wallis (then age 9) correcting an AP Reporter who said she was “just going to call her Annie” instead of learning how to pronounce her name. Never forget.  (via thechanelmuse)

(via igperish)


huntokar:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

200 protesters continue to march for justice on Thursday night, Aug. 21st.

I wonder how many people had completely forgotten what this whole thing is actually about and expected this to end when the police stopped attacking them. This isn’t over, it’s LITERALLY just starting. The police raids weren’t the issue, they were distracting from the issue. This won’t stop until the murderer and coward Darren Wilson faces actual justice.

(via hero-of-spooky)



If someone were to die at the age of 63 after a lifelong battle with MS or Sickle Cell, we’d all say they were a “fighter” or an “inspiration.” But when someone dies after a lifelong battle with severe mental illness and drug addiction, we say it was a tragedy and tell everyone “don’t be like him, please seek help.” That’s bullshit. Robin Williams sought help his entire life. He saw a psychiatrist. He quit drinking. He went to rehab. He did this for decades. That’s HOW he made it to 63. For some people, 63 is a fucking miracle. I know several people who didn’t make it past 23 and I’d do anything to have 40 more years with them.

anonymous reader on The Dish

One of the more helpful and insightful things I’ve seen about depression/suicide in the last couple of days.

(via mysweetetc)

(via kiwithegr8)


Anonymous said: what about Gaza and Ferguson John? do they not deserve your respect? you're such a hypocrite, i's disgusting

undeclared-college-student:

fishingboatproceeds:

I think this is a deeply flawed way of looking at the world.

Now, I have talked about Ferguson, and I’ve talked about Gaza. (In fact, I’ve been writing and talking about Israel and Palestine for more than a decade.) But there are many important problems facing the world that I haven’t talked about: I haven’t talked much about the civil war in South Sudan, or the epidemic of suicide among American military personnel, or the persecution of Muslim Rohingya people in Myanmar.

Is that okay? Is it okay for me to talk about, say, racism in football and lowering infant mortality in Ethiopia? Or must we all agree to discuss only  whatever is currently the ascendant news story? Is it disrespectful to Ferguson protesters to talk about continued political oppression in Egypt now that we are no longer reblogging images of the protests in Tahrir Square? I think this is a false choice: If you are talking about Ferguson and I am talking about Ethiopian health care, neither of us is hurting the other.

I think the challenge for activists and philanthropists online is in paying sustained attention, not over days or weeks but over years and decades. And I worry that when we turn our attention constantly from one outrage to another we end up not investing the time and work to facilitate actual change. We say “THE WORLD IS WATCHING,” and it is…until it isn’t. We’ve seen this again and again in Gaza and the West Bank. We’re seeing it in Iran. We’re seeing it in South Sudan. And we’re seeing it in the U.S., from net neutrality to Katrina recovery.

The truth is, these problems are complicated, and when the outrage passes we’re left with big and tangled and nuanced problems. I feel that too often that’s when we stop paying attention, because it gets really hard and there’s always a shiny new problem somewhere else that’s merely outrageous. I hope you’re paying attention to Ferguson in five years, anon, and I hope I am, too. I also hope I’m paying attention to child death in Ethiopia. I don’t think these things are mutually exclusive.

I really don’t want to minimize the effectiveness of online activism, because I know that it works: To use a personal example, I’ve learned a TON from the LGBT+ and sexual assault survivor communities in recent years online. People on tumblr make fun of me for apologizing all the time, but I apologize all the time because I am learning all the time, and every day I’m like, “Oh, man, Current Me has realized that Previous Me was so wrong about this!”

But we can only learn when we can listen. And when you call me a hypocrite for talking about X instead of talking about Y, it makes it really hard to listen.

At times, online discourse to me feels like we just sit in a circle screaming at each other until people get their feelings hurt and withdraw from the conversation, which leaves us with ever-smaller echo chambers, until finally we’re left only with those who entirely agree with us. I don’t think that’s how the overall worldwide level of suck gets decreased.

I might be wrong, of course. I often am. But I think we have to find ways to embrace nuance and complexity online. It’s hard—very, very hard—to make the most generous, most accepting, most forgiving assumptions about others. But I also really do think it’s the best way forward.

And THAT is the proper way to shut down anon hate

One of my ultimate pet peeves is when people trash other people for supporting a different important cause. Get over yourself, Anon. 


thefrogman:

In the wake of her father’s death, some very cruel people sent disturbing messages to zeldawilliams. I found out that she is trying to raise money for St. Jude Children’s Hospital—a charity both her and her father have supported for a long time.

I thought maybe it would be a nice gesture if we could send some love her way and also help some kids in the process. I think that would be a fitting tribute and it might counter the internet awfulness she had to endure. 

DONATE HERE!

(via fishingboatproceeds)


thefrogman:

In the wake of her father’s death, some very cruel people sent disturbing messages to zeldawilliams. I found out that she is trying to raise money for St. Jude Children’s Hospital—a charity both her and her father have supported for a long time.
I thought maybe it would be a nice gesture if we could send some love her way and also help some kids in the process. I think that would be a fitting tribute and it might counter the internet awfulness she had to endure. 
DONATE HERE!

silversarcasm:

[Gifset: Laverne Cox speaks at the GLAAD media awards, she says,

"Each and every one of us has the capacity to be an oppressor. I want to encourage each and every one of us to interrogate how we might be an oppressor, and how we might be able to become liberators for ourselves and each other."]

femmeanddangerous:

(x)

(Source: fuckyeahlavernecox, via fishingboatproceeds)